Fruits-Banner.jpg

Pollination

Most fruit trees require pollination to produce fruit.  Some trees are capable of pollinating themselves (self-fertile), others require pollen from another tree (self-sterile).  As a general rule, pollenizers should be no more than 50 feet apart from one another, though trees up to 200 feet apart may cross-pollinize.  The adjacent chart outlines the general requirements for common fruits.  See the variety descriptions for more specific information.  (Note - an insect or critter that spreads pollen from one plant to another is a pollinator, while a plant that produces pollen necessary to fertilize blossoms on another plant is a pollenizer.  

Apples

Require a pollenizer.  Some varieties are pollen sterile and will not pollenize other apples.  See descriptions and pollination chart.

Almonds

Most almonds require a pollenizer.  The "All In One" variety is self fertile.  Titan, a cold hardy almond, is pollenized by most peach trees

Apricots

Self-fertile

Berries

Most Berries are self-fertile, see descriptions.  Plant two or more varieties of blueberries.

Citrus

Most are self-fertile

Cherries, Sweet

Most require a pollenizer, though some varieties are self-fertile (e.g. Stella and Lapins)

Cherries, Sour, or Pie

Most are self-fertile

Figs

Self-fertile

Filberts

Require a pollenizer

Grapes

Self Fertile

Peaches

Most are self-pollinating, though there are some exceptions, such as JH Hale & Indian Blood, that require a pollenizer

Pears

Require a pollenizer

Plums - Japanese

Require a pollenizer

Plums - European

Partly self-fertile, plant a pollenizer for increased production, see variety for specific requirements

Persimmon

Self fertile

Walnuts

Require a pollenizer when young, self fertile when mature