Stella2.jpgCherries are a mixed bag in the Klamath Region.  The trees grow well in our area, and on good years they are the first tree fruit of the season, providing that precious, early fresh fruit, pies, cobblers and jams, and a bonanza for market farmers.  They are, however, susceptible a range of bacterial and fungal diseases, and our region often gets June rains that may split and rot the ripening fruit.   Cherries require a well-drained soil and will die out in heavy soils.  Cherries on standard rootstock will become very tall, up to 40 feet, so it is advisable to obtain them on a dwarfing rootstock such Gisella or Krymsk 5.  The recent arrival in the Mid Klamath of the Two-Spotted Drosophila, a fruit fly that infests cherries and other soft fruits, has many folks discouraged about growing cherries.  See our bulletin on this pest for more details.

Cherries at a Glance

Climate Zones:

Sweet cherries – USDA zones 5-9, Sunset zones 2,6,7,14-18, 32, 34-37, 39

Pie Cherries – USDA zone 3, Sunset zones 1-9, 14-17, 33-43

Chill Requirement:

600-1300 hours

Pollination:

Most sweet cherries require a pollenizer; Lapins, Stella & Montmorency are self-fertile.

Rootstocks:

Krymsk 5

Mazzard

Height:

12-20’

18-30’

Width:

6-10’

8-15

Years to First Fruit:

2-4

2-4

Life Expectancy:

30 years +

35 years +

Yield when Mature:

60 LB

80-100LB